Revisiting Kent Treble Bob Minor

At this point I decided to re-visit Kent Treble Bob Minor, hoping to use it to improve the skill of rapidly and reliably knowing my bells’ places. I had never previously succeeded in getting the Kent Places secure but other than these, Kent is plain hunt patterns with dodges as in Plain Bob.  My observations on Kent were:

  • Each pair has two plain hunting patterns at any one time, depending on the position of the treble. You switch patterns at an unfamiliar time as working bells do not dodge in 1-2 but do at the back.  
  • The Slow work has a rhythm to it.   While the slow bell leads the other hunts and while it's making seconds the other dodges.  I had learned to do this on 1-2 years ago.  Funnily enough, when I first rang 5-6 I struggled when the 5th was in the slow, and concluded that only my left hand had ever rung the slow work before!
  • If I am honest, Kent places just feel unnatural, and this is probably because they’re “wrong places”. One of the pair grinds to a halt in its hunting at a backstroke and stays put for the handstroke too.  As it does so, its partner catches up a blow towards it.  The first bell then moves on to the next place and the other steps back.   The first one then stays put again and the second catches up, regaining their original relative positions. It simply doesn’t “flow”.

Although the discipline of trying to get Kent right was useful in itself, it didn’t help in progressing as I was still essentially ringing by plain hunt patterns. I needed another way to address being able to reliably see my bells’ places and respond to them. I recalled an earlier exercise done with Peter Church & a fellow novice a few times – that of making 4ths in response to the treble being in 2-3 without considering what the method’s line* looked like. This had seemed a straightforward idea, but proved quite hard in execution; it clearly offered glimmers of light. I suddenly wondered if place notation, if not a tool to ultimately use on its own for handbell ringing, might offer a way through my barrier.   

* Single Court Bob Minor

 

Sgurr a'Chaorachain

Submitted by Simon on Sat, 13/02/2021 - 20:38

Sgurr aChaorachain

Sgurr a'Chaorachain Surprise Royal is basically a ten-bell version of Zanussi Surprise Maximus. It has gained some popularity in recent years and we have had some success ringing in in the tower at Scottish Association practices. It has just appeared on the menu for the Five o'Clock Handbell Club, at...

Littleport Little Surprise

Submitted by Simon on Fri, 05/02/2021 - 21:18

Littleport

Sometimes described as "poor man's Bristol Royal", Littleport extends Bristol Major to Royal by turning the treble around in 8th place, maintaining the pattern of points and fishtails at the back, and filling in with triples dodge above the treble across the half lead. The same idea works for maximus...

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Submitted by Simon on Wed, 30/12/2020 - 09:28

Several of the Five o'Clock Club quarters have involved myself, Simon Rudd and Simon Humphrey. We speculated about the appropriate collective noun (possibly an "excellence") and then thought of trying to ring a Simons quarter. Simon Linford was the obvious fourth person, as he has been doing a lot in Ringing Room...

What is the minimum hardware for online ringing?

Submitted by Simon on Mon, 21/12/2020 - 17:09

A while ago, during discussions with the eBells consortium, the following question came up: what are the minimum hardware requirements for online ringing? We know that Ringing Room doesn't really work with tablets or smartphones, so we assume that everyone has a laptop or desktop PC to use, but what if...

Woodbine Delight Minor

Submitted by Simon on Sat, 19/12/2020 - 09:13

During the last few weeks, Tina and I have extended our handbell ringing circle to include Caroline, who was put in contact with us by Lesley Belcher (chair of ART). Caroline was confident ringing Plain Bob, so the idea was to progress towards Kent and Oxford and beyond. We worked...

Method extension

Submitted by Simon on Sun, 13/12/2020 - 21:01

This isn't particularly a handbell-related topic, although it is prompted by ringing (on handbells) the major, royal and maximus versions of the methods that I discussed in the previous article: Cambridge, Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and especially Bristol. One of the things I find difficult about Bristol Royal and Maximus is the wrong...